Vampiric Mist Tactics

Alas, there isn’t much to say about vampiric mist, which is what you end up with when the body of a vampire is destroyed but its essence isn’t. With no way to form a new body, it floats around aimlessly, feeding off victims by employing a sort of necrotic vacuum effect to pull blood out of victims’ pores and facial orifices.

I normally begin by looking at a creature’s ability contour, but in this case, there’s not much point. There’s only one stat that matters, and that’s its Intelligence, which is subsapient. Vampiric mist has no judgment, only instinct. Moreover, it has no attack action per se, only Life Drain, an effect that requires a saving throw to resist. Vampiric mist isn’t so much a creature as it is a punishment.

Because of their Sunlight Sensitivity, vampiric mists come outside only after dark, and they don’t mess around with civil, nautical or astronomical twilight. It’s nighttime or nothing.

Also, thanks to the Forbiddance feature, one is safe from vampiric mist as long as one is inside a residential building, either one’s own home or someone else’s. (“The mist can’t enter a residence without an invitation from one of the occupants,” but seriously, who’s going to invite a grayish-crimson, foul-smelling cloud of vapor to come inside, especially one that can’t even knock on the door or answer the question, “Who’s there?”) Inns are a gray area: If you’ve ever read a zoning ordinance, you know that inns are commercial, not residential. On the other hand, a rented room at an inn can be an individual’s primary place of residence and therefore, in a legal sense, their home. As Dungeon Master, you make the call regarding whether a player character has a permanent enough arrangement with an inn to construe their room as a residence. There’s no ambiguity around monasteries and convents: as both permanent residences and hallowed ground, they’re safe. But adventurers spend a lot of time on the road, and a tent is not a building, period. Continue reading Vampiric Mist Tactics

Two ENnie Nominations!

Well, knock me over with a feather: The judges have chosen nominees for the 2020 ENnie Awards, and The Monsters Know What They’re Doing is on there twice, nominated for Best Online Content (for this blog) and Best Writing (for the eponymous book). Huzzah!

The ENies are “people’s choice” awards, which means your favorite nominees are counting on you to show your support! To cast your ballot, visit http://ennie-awards.com/vote/2020/ by July 12.

To vote for Best Online Content: http://ennie-awards.com/vote/2020/ballot.php?category_id=13

To vote for Best Writing: http://ennie-awards.com/vote/2020/ballot.php?category_id=21

Your enthusiastic comments have kept this project going since 2016. I initially wasn’t sure a demand existed for tactical analyses of monster behavior, but you’ve shown me that not only is there demand for it, there’s a hunger for it. Thanks for letting me feed you.

Live to Tell the Tale Online Tactics Workshop, June 27

Live to Tell the Tale CoverMany people talk about highly tactical combat and immersive roleplaying as if they were opposite ends of a spectrum. They’re not! Knowing how your player characters fight and win is a way of roleplaying their competence—and keeping them alive means keeping their stories going!

To promote the upcoming release of Live to Tell the Tale: Combat Tactics for Player Characters, I’ve invited five D&D streamers—RJ Cresswell (The Grimwode Saga), Katie “Goblinkatie” Downey (D4, Stellar Arcanum), LaTia Jacquise (Rivals of Waterdeep), Blythe Kala (Star Trek: Perseverance) and B. Dave Walters (Beyond Heroes, L.A. by Night)—to put tactical advice into action in a livestreamed combat encounter this Saturday, June 27, from 2 to 4 PM CDT (7 to 9 PM UTC) at twitch.tv/KeithAmmann.

Each of these players will bring a new level 1 protagonist to the table, and we’ll talk about how to play each of those PCs effectively. Then those PCs’ “future selves”—level 5 versions of the originals—will band together to confront a deadly foe. Will they prevail? I think so . . . but I don’t plan to make it easy!

Meazel Tactics

Meazels are, to put it simply, kidnappers. Misanthropic humanoids warped by toxic levels of exposure to the Shadowfell, they skulk through the shadows, throttle their victims with cords, and teleport away with them to some godsforsaken locale where they can murder them free from interference.

With low Strength and low Constitution but very high Dexterity, meazels are not in any way suited to attrition fighting; they want to grab their victims and go. Their high Intelligence and above-average Wisdom mark them as crafty judges of whom they need to jump first. They have proficiency in Perception and Stealth, the classic ambush predator combination, and should always begin combat hidden. Their 120 feet of darkvision suits them to subterranean as well as nocturnal existence.

The core of the meazel’s strategy is the Garrote/Shadow Teleport combination. Meazels have two attack actions, Garrote and Shortsword, which do the same damage on average; however, Shortsword is a straightforward melee weapon attack that just happens to deal some bonus necrotic damage as a rider. Garrote, on the other hand, grapples on a hit and enables the meazel, on a subsequent turn, to Shadow Teleport away along with the grappled victim! For low- to mid-level player characters, this combination is potentially nasty, because the range of Shadow Teleport—500 feet—means the victim of the meazel’s maneuver is cut off from allies who might be able to help them. They’re on their own, possibly still with a strangling cord around their neck. Continue reading Meazel Tactics

Trapper and Girallon Tactics

These two monsters have nothing to do with each other except that (a) they’re the last two monsters from Volo’s Guide to Monsters that I planned to look at and hadn’t yet, and (b) neither one is all that interesting. Although, to my surprise, the one I thought would be more interesting turned out not to be interesting at all, while the one I thought would be less interesting turned out to be a little more so. Continue reading Trapper and Girallon Tactics